| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Browse and search Google Drive and Gmail attachments (plus Dropbox and Slack files) with a unified tool for working with your cloud files. Try Dokkio (from the makers of PBworks) for free. Now available on the web, Mac, Windows, and as a Chrome extension!

View
 

video-sharing-sites

Page history last edited by Katie Day 12 years, 6 months ago

 

 

Definition

 

Online video clips are short, usually low-quality videos that can be viewed online or sometimes downloaded.  More information about online videos can be found at Wikipedia.

 

Below are the best known brands or examples of video sharing websites.  Click on a logo to go to the website.  

 

These sites let you create accounts and upload your own videos to share.  For example, Keri-Lee has uploaded the promotional video that she made (using Animoto) and played at our staff meeting up on YouTube.  Just in case you forgot what prizes are on offer for completing this online technology journey, have another look here.

           

 

       

 

 

 

These sites publish videos for people to watch, but don't let people upload their own videos.  So the quality of the video clips tends to be higher, on the whole.

 

       


 

Note that our school subscribes to UnitedStreaming and Atomic Learning, so while those websites might have some free content, we have access to their premium content.

 

 

top 
 

Exercises to try

 

NOVICE

  1. First, the fun task.  Choose a YouTube video to watch and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast.  

    Try Keri-Lee's favourites, Katie's favourites, and/or search YouTube yourself.  See also: Intelligent Life at YouTube: The 80 Best Educational Video Collections

     

  2. Next, the mind-opening task.  Choose a TED talk to watch and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast.  

    Try Keri-Lee's favourites, Katie's favourites, and/or search the TED website yourself.

     

  3. Third, the practical task.  Choose an Atomic Learning tutorial to watch and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast

    Try Keri-Lee's favourites, Katie's favourites, and/or search Atomic Learning yourself.

     

APPRENTICE

  1. First, the fun task.  Choose a YouTube video to watch and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast.

    Try Keri-Lee's favourites, Katie's favourites, and search/or YouTube yourself.  See also: Intelligent Life at YouTube: The 80 Best Educational Video Collections

    Sign up for a YouTube account and add a video to your "Favorites".

     

  2. Next, the mind-opening task.  Choose a TED talk to watch and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast.

    Try Keri-Lee's favourites, Katie's favourites, and/or search the TED website yourself.

    Sign up to receive TED updates via email -- that way you won't miss any of the new ones when they come out.

     

  3. Third, the practical task.  Choose an Atomic Learning tutorial to watch and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast.

    Try Keri-Lee's favourites, Katie's favourites, and/or search Atomic Learning yourself.

 

PRACTITIONER

  1. First, undertake one or two of the tasks for either the Novice or Apprentice above.

     

  2. Second, sign up for a UnitedStreaming account (if you don't have one already).

    IMPORTANT:  You will need our school's account number in order to sign up for UnitedStreaming as it is a subscription service.  Detailed instructions about how to sign up (including our account number) can be found on our school server.  See this PDF file:  [East Primary School Group Work drive]\Teachers work\United Streaming 

     

  3. Find a video on UnitedStreaming to support one of your upcoming units of inquiry or, if you're not a teacher, then any subject that interests you.  Then bookmark it on Delicious and tag it with connectingeast as well as at least three other relevant tags.

 

EXPERT 

  1. Undertake one or two of the tasks for either the Apprentice or Practitioner above.

     

  2. Upload one of your own videos to one of the video sharing sites and bookmark it on Delicious with the tag connectingeast.

 

top 
 

Further reading/exploration

 

If you have an hour and are interested, have a watch of "An anthropological introduction to YouTube", a talk given at the Library of Congress in June 2008 by Michael Wesch, a professor of digital ethnography (who won the U.S. University Professor of the Year award in 2008), in which he discusses how he researched YouTube with his students.  Wesch is best known for his videos (up on YouTube, of course): A Vision of Students Today,  The Machine is Us/ing Us, and  Information R/evolution.

 

Kevin Kelly, a thinker worth knowing about, published a long article in the New York Times in November 2008:  Becoming Screen Literate, which I recommend. 

 

<<A new distribution-and-display technology is nudging the book aside and catapulting images, and especially moving images, to the center of the culture. We are becoming people of the screen. The fluid and fleeting symbols on a screen pull us away from the classical notions of monumental authors and authority. On the screen, the subjective again trumps the objective. The past is a rush of data streams cut and rearranged into a new mashup, while truth is something you assemble yourself on your own screen as you jump from link to link. We are now in the middle of a second Gutenberg shift — from book fluency to screen fluency, from literacy to visuality.>>

 

If you want to watch a video of him, see Kevin Kelly: Predicting the next 5,000 days of the web on the TED website (filmed in Dec. 2007).

 

top 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.